CosmEffect
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Time is so ubiquitous that it covers absolutely everything we do, encapsulating our own existence and that of everything we know. It could be said that there is nothing that exists outside of time. Time is the flowing in a forward direction of all things that exist, an indefinite continued progress, every second absorbing the last, consuming it as we move forward in the space-time continuum. You are somewhere reading this right now, and you are also some-when.

But for such a permanent fixture of our lives, time is actually quite flexible and far more descript than the given intuition we have of it. How can time affect our lives, our thoughts, our perceptions? And is time as straightforward as it seems to our intuition, our experience of it? What are the different ways we can think about time, and what can we learn from it? Time can be a fixed point, such as 11:14 PM on Tuesday, May 12, or a measurement between two points, as in one second or one minute in the continuum of the flow of all things. This very second will never exist again. Here are ten interesting conceptions of time to give you a more nuanced view on this fascinating part of the fabric of our existence.



http://listverse.com/2018/06/12/10-interesting-conceptions-on-the-nature-of-time/

Consciousness in Cosmos
Cosmos in Consciousness
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wizard
I'm reading Kant's Critique of Pure Reason, and it's wonderful (horribly difficult for me, but satisfying). His concept of space feels spot-on, but his attempt to grapple with time just shows how difficult it is.

Maybe there's only one moment, and "the world" (with us along for the ride) travels through that single moment.

There's a Christopher Priest novel called The Inverted World, which is basically about time. A city on railroad tracks is always moving toward "the optimum," which keeps moving forward. The places this city leaves behind, is called the past. The landscape ahead of them is always called the future. If you walk back into the past too far a kind of horizontal gravity pulls you into infinity, but the future is impenetrable. You have to wait for The Optimum to move forward.

Later in the book a character suggests that they are on an infinite planet within a finite universe, so the city is trying to stay within the universe, and The Optimum is that small area of space that exists within the universe.

The whole analogy falls apart when I try to imagine how the planet can "exist" outside the universe, but it's a great visualization.
-Pog Princess
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CosmEffect
@wizard An interesting concept that once passed through my head, after reading that article, is that time could perhaps be akin to a thermodynamic process, moleculear or otherwise.

That time speeds up and slows down in the world perceptibly to us when our attention is focused on something or not, if we are in the flow, and when we change our default consciousness in various ways, shapes, and forms - could be an indication that like space, time (perception) is a landscape with mountains and valleys of durations.

If we assume that time perception may work dynamically or thermodynamically and that some durations last shorter or longer than others and moments have their equilibrated state, how would this change or alter the view of 'The Optimum' in the Inverted World or the perspective of Kant? Would the optimum be like a thermodynamical equilibration in the universe, whereas the world experiences longer and more durations in the present? Then what of the past? Could it be unstable and gravationally dense or unstable since it just amasses more and more to the process? Could it be that when time is out of equilibrium, it warps and distorts beyond what can be fathomed? 

Anyways, it's just an odd thought that crossed my mind at some point in time and its just speculation, but thinking with different perceptual filters of the unknown, such as the nature of time, is rather intriguing and may lead... Somewhere eventually, or not. 
Consciousness in Cosmos
Cosmos in Consciousness
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