CosmEffect
I have yet to read this whole text, but as a Taoist cosmology of spirit, how can one go wrong?

The Cosmic Spirit: 
https://www.sacred-texts.com/tao/tgl/tgl1.htm

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Thus we see that the great man interested in the Tao lives happily without anxieties: his outlook is without fears because he feels Heaven is a covering, the Earth is a chariot, the four seasons his steeds, Yin and Yang his drivers. He rides on the pinnacle of the clouds, through space, a compeer of the Creator. He gives reins to his will; he opens out his mind to travel the great empyrean. He walks when he so desires, or rushes on when he so wills. He commands the Rain Spirit (star) to irrigate his way, and employs the Wind God to sweep away the dust. The lightening he takes for whip, the revolving breath of thunder as wind for his chariot wheels. Above, he travels in the boundless waste of space; below, he comes forth at the gates of the great void. He looks all round in space and gazes abroad on everything, yet keeping all under the central organ master of the four quarters he brings everything within the range of the master spirit within. And so it was that, with Heaven canopying all, there was nothing outside the pale of his influence: with Earth as chariot, there was nothing outside his range: with the four Seasons as steeds, he has all things as ministers: with Yin and Yang as charioteers, there is nothing lacking; the processes of creation are complete. So there is no instability in this immense effort: there is no toil in the profound operations. There has been no fatigue of body nor diminution of intelligence. How was it that they gained a knowledge of the conditions of Heaven and Earth? It was because they had the authority of the Tao that they traversed the illimitable world.

Cosmica Naturata
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CosmEffect
Part II - Response of Matter to the Movement of The Cosmic Spirit -  

https://www.sacred-texts.com/tao/tgl/tgl5.htm

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We may compare the Taoist view of life in one respect with that of Socrates. Socrates maintained that he was at his best when his daimonion was working, and his thought clearest when he was most sure of divine guidance. Prof. Bury says that "Socrates represents his own life-work as a sort of religious quest: he feels convinced that in devoting himself to philosophic discussion he had done the bidding of a superhuman guide and he goes to death rather than be untrue to his personal conviction. Because of this he became the champion of free discussion and the supremacy of the individual conscience over human law." And we have the Taoist view that human enactments and the wisdom of Sages may be abolished. Tradition binds man and therefore is inferior to "conscience". If men followed the Tao they would never be opportunists, but always act according to principle and right. Both had unbounded faith in spiritual law. Mere human knowledge is of itself wholly inadequate and uncertain. But the Tao is always full to those who have the mind for it.


Cosmica Naturata
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CosmEffect
Part III - Influence on the Cosmic Spirit on the Universe - 

https://www.sacred-texts.com/tao/tgl/tgl6.htm

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There is nothing in the world easier than goodness and nothing more difficult than depravity. By "goodness" is meant tranquility of mind, undisturbed by cupidity. By "depravity" is meant a grasping spirit with many cravings. He who is satisfied with the simple needs of his nature, refusing the superfluous delights of the world, will not be tempted by any seductions. He who follows the law of his nature, will preserve his soul, without any inward conflicts. Hence the statement "It is easy to be good." Clambering up city walls, scaling dangerous heights, thieving the official keys forging and stealing official money, rebelling and murdering, lying and bearing false witness, are acts contrary to human nature. Hence the saying, "It is difficult to be bad."
Cosmica Naturata
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